Thursday, September 20, 2018 COURTENAY – A new project led by the Comox Valley Economic Development Society (CVEDS) will receive $30,000 in funding from the Island Coastal Economic Trust to support the development of an agri-food innovation strategy for the Comox Valley. Technology is changing how almost every industry operates, however Canadian food producers have fallen behind their competitors in the global agri-foods sector. As a leading agri-food and culinary region, the Comox Valley has the potential to fully embrace and provide long-term support for agri-food innovation. “Changes in purchasing patterns, e-commerce and technologies like robotics and autonomous vehicles are just a few of the examples which could impact the nature and the labour force of the agriculture and agri-food industry,” said Mayor Josie Osborne, ICET Chair. “There is tremendous potential for communities in our region to be at the forefront of innovation ensuring that we get the highest possible value for our primary products.” The project, a comprehensive Agriculture Sector, Agri-food and Seafood Innovation Strategy, will be a key component of the five-year Comox Valley Regional Economic Development Plan. “The strategy will consider potential growth areas for future and long-term agri-business development, ag-based infrastructure and inputs required for future growth, ag-tech and emerging innovations and trends in digitization, automation, production supply chains, e-commerce and direct to consumer demand,” stated John Watson CVEDS Executive Director. Funding for the project is provided through the Sectoral Development Strategies funding stream of the Economic Development Readiness Program.  Up to $30,000 in matching funding is available for targeted sectoral strategies, bringing together stakeholders to develop plans to support new investment, increase productivity and grow business opportunities. “CVEDS has collaborated extensively with the region’s agricultural stakeholders for many years, in the expansion and support of this important sector,” said Justin Rigsby CVEDS Board President.  “Stakeholders will be invited to engage in this project to bring industry-led understanding of the longer trends in agriculture development, how future agri-businesses and ag-tech start-ups can enhance and create new sustainable opportunities for growth and investment in the Comox Valley.” The project is expected to begin in early fall, with completion anticipated by March 2019. About the Island Coastal Economic Trust Created and capitalized by the Province of BC, the Island Coastal Economic Trust has been at the forefront of economic diversification, planning and regional revitalization for the past twelve years. ICET is independently governed by a Board of Directors and two Regional Advisory Committees which include more than 50 locally elected officials, MLAs and appointees from the Island and Coast. This exceptional team of leaders collaborate to set regional priorities and build vital multi-regional networks. Through a community centered decision-making process, ICET has approved almost $50 million in funding for over 180 economic infrastructure and economic development readiness projects.  These investments have leveraged over $270 million in new investment into the region creating more than 2500 construction phase jobs and 2600 long term permanent jobs. A full overview of ICET can be found at www.islandcoastaltrust.ca. -end- For further information: Line Robert, CEO Island Coastal Economic Trust Tel. 250-871-7797 (Ext. 227) line.robert@islandcoastaltrust.ca Mayor Josie Osborne, ICET Chair District of Tofino Tel. 250-725-3229 osborne@tofino.ca John Watson, Executive Director Comox Valley Economic Development Society Tel. 250-792-0375 john@investcomoxvalley.com
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Considered one of the forms of future world food, aquaculture has become one of the greatest strengths in British Colombia, in western Canada. This is one of the most developed economic activities accounting for almost 50 percent of world fishery products for food. Canada offers a variety of nearly 100 species of crustaceans, fish and marine plants cultivated in special farms, which reduce the gap between limited natural resources and the demand of the world population. Although Asian countries, led by China, India and Vietnam are the largest aquaculture producers in the world, the North American area has historical growth in recent years and has achieved a strong presence in global markets. The west coast of Canada has significantly developed these mariculture and therefore is home to one of the most important festivals of aquaculture to do business, make innovations, industry leaders, suppliers and international representatives throughout North America and Europe. Source: http://www.notimex.gob.mx/fotogaleriasInterior/112
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Translated from Spanish: 8/16/2016 9:50:01 BUSINESS By Olga Ojeda Lajud Comox Valley, British Columbia, Canada, Aug 16 (Notimex) .- Considered one of the forms of future world food, aquaculture has become one of the greatest strengths in British Colombia, in western Canada. Canada already offers a range of about 100 species of crustaceans, fish and marine plants cultivated in special farms, which reduce the gap between limited natural resources and the demand of the world population. The Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) defines aquaculture as the activity focused on the farming of aquatic organisms in coastal and inland areas, involving intervention in the rearing process to enhance production. It is considered one of the most developed economic activities accounting for almost 50 percent of world fishery products for food. The west coast of Canada has significantly developed these mariculture and therefore is home to one of the most important festivals of aquaculture to do business, make innovations, industry leaders, suppliers and international representatives throughout North America and Europe. Although Asian countries, led by China, India and Vietnam are the largest aquaculture producers in the world, the North American area has historical growth in recent years and has achieved a strong presence in global markets. Therefore, recently, the so-called BC Shellfish and Food Festival was held in the Comox Valley, one of the regions of the west coast with strong presence of farmers, and brought together 30 leading research fields, development, business and government representatives and experts in innovation and mobilization of knowledge among institutions. According to FAO, aquaculture established a record high production and now provides nearly half of sea food that is intended for human consumption. FAO estimates that ratio will increase 62 percent by 2030. To date, almost 567 aquatic species cultivated worldwide. 80 percent of total production derived from animals such as omnivores and herbivores fish and shellfish. Source: http://www.notimex.gob.mx/ntxnotaLibre/225463#
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Translated from Spanish. 15/08/2016 10:22:01 BUSINESS By Olga Ojeda Lajud Comox Valley, British Columbia, Canada, Aug 15 (Notimex) .- The producers of fresh salmon farms in Canada increased their production and take advantage of natural problems faced by other major producers of this species in the world. 60 percent of the world's salmon production is performed in hatcheries, but an outbreak of parasites in the Norwegian Sea, the largest producer in the world and an alga that has slowed production in Chile, the second largest producer, have declined global production. Experts estimate that world production of farmed salmon could be reduced by seven percent, with very accessible prices for consumers. The problems prompted salmon production in other countries like Canada, the British Columbia coast has 109 salmon farms authorized and established a new record for exports produced in aquaculture farms. The coast of British Columbia produces about 75 thousand metric tons of salmon and exports 70 percent of its production around the world. Salmon farming began an experimental level in the 60s, but became industry in Norway in the 80s and 90s in Chile. While farmed salmon has faced criticism from those who consider it a threat to human health because it artificially breeding, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) promotes it as a possible solution to keep biodiversity of the oceans and meet global demand for protein. According to various Canadian farmers consulted, there is no definitive scientific, business or gastronomic arguments to demonize the consumption of farmed salmon because they assure farms must meet strict standards to ensure the quality of production. At present, salmon farming is also carried out in countries such as Australia, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Ireland and New Zealand, according to Global Salmon Initiative (GSI), which seeks to improve the sustainability of the sector. Source: http://www.notimex.gob.mx/ntxnotaLibre/224965
08/14/2016 10:29:01 Translated from Spanish. By Olga Ojeda Lajud. Comox Valley, British Columbia, Canada, Aug 14 (Notimex) .- Producers of farmed salmon farms Canada begin to see Mexico as an attractive market for the consumption of this product. Currently, due to the high price that has farmed salmon in Mexico and its citizens preference for fresh salmon consumed only in small volumes. "The cost of fresh fish is too high to have a mass market in Mexico. Is just developing, I think Mexico can be a big market in the future, but just being developed, "the CEO of Cermaq Salmon Studio, a subsidiary of Mitsubishi, Fernando Villarroel said. In Mexico, a fillet of fresh salmon grown in farm costs about $ 12 per kilo, before processing, making it a luxury product. United States and Asian countries led by Japan are the major consumers of fresh farmed salmon farms, whose major world producers are Norway and Chile. Although demand in Mexico focuses on fresh frozen salmon which is imported from Chile, producers of fresh farmed salmon in Canada are beginning to see in the country an attractive market, especially to take advantage of the benefits of the Free Trade Agreement North America (NAFTA). "We have a Free Trade Agreement between Canada, the United States and Mexico and are always looking for new markets, then I would love to see salmon in British Columbia in Mexico," said the executive director of the Association of salmon hatcheries in British Columbia, Jeremy Dunn . The production cycle of salmon is about three years. The first year of production is carried out in controlled environments freshwater and is then transported to cages in the marine environment, once it reaches an optimal size to processing plants is transported and prepared for sale. For consumers, most of the salmon fillets are offered, but you can also buy the whole fish. According to the Global Salmon Initiative (GSI) explains, often several natural conditions must be met to ensure optimum production of farmed salmon as low water temperatures ranging between 8 ° C and 14oC, a protected coastal area and appropriate biological conditions. At present, salmon farming is also carried out in countries such as Australia, the Faroe Islands, Iceland, Ireland and New Zealand. Source: http://www.notimex.gob.mx/ntxnotaLibre/224607
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B.C. food businesses sold more products outside of Canada than ever before in 2015, with exports reaching a record $3.5 billion, and that number is anticipated to grow as the Governments of Canada and British Columbia continue efforts to promote high-quality B.C. food overseas. One way the two governments are working with B.C. companies to build on the almost 20% growth in exports from 2014 is through an Export Ready Business Catalogue. The catalogue features close to 100 B.C. producers of fruits and vegetables, seafood, meat, packaged food, natural health products and beverage makers, and all of them are ready to sell. Each profile includes an introduction to the company or association and their products, their current export markets, and markets they are interested in expanding to. The guide represents B.C.’s diverse agri-food and seafood sector, and includes everything from sea urchins to cereals, and waffles to wine. The guides will be available in multiple languages, online and at trade offices and shows. B.C. companies exported more than 600 types of foods to over 150 markets in 2015. As Canada’s westernmost province, B.C. is perfectly located to send fresh and tasty B.C. agri-food and seafood products to the Asia Pacific region, and consumers there are interested, with China and South Korea both among the fastest growing major markets in 2015. The B.C. government has focused on helping the province’s agri-food businesses expand sales through a network of 13 international trade offices, and trade missions have established and fostered relationships with buyers from around the world. This is in addition to the Government of Canada’s trade offices and on-going trade missions around the world. The two governments also deliver a $4.3-million program that provides matching funds to support B.C. industry participation at international tradeshows, promotional events, incoming and outgoing trade missions, and to develop marketing materials for international audiences. The Export Ready Business Catalogue was funded through Growing Forward 2, a federal-provincial-territorial initiative that provides a $3-billion investment over five years in innovation, competitiveness and market development.
Quotes: Lawrence MacAulay, Federal Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food – “Canadian agri-food and seafood products are among the best in the world. This investment will help showcase these high quality products internationally, resulting in more market opportunities, growth and jobs for the Canadian agri-food sector.” Norm Letnick, B.C. Minister of Agriculture – “The partnership between the B.C. and federal governments and B.C. food companies has resulted in a 20% growth in exports in one year, and a new record of $3.5 billion set in 2015. The Export-Ready Catalogue unveiled today builds on that by introducing almost 100 B.C. companies that are ready to sell to buyers worldwide, and showcases the innovation, entrepreneurship and high quality products made by British Columbians and enjoyed worldwide.” Marco Mazzucco, Asti Holdings Group – “Being an Italian immigrant family it was natural for us to see the market opportunities for our products beyond Canada. What a ride it’s been! We’ve worked hard to get our Golden Bonbon almond nougat products on local store shelves and in premium supermarkets in Japan, Korea, China and throughout most of South East Asia. This catalogue will help even more B.C. companies start their own journey of looking, working, travelling and exporting. B.C. has a diverse range of premium products that discerned consumers are waiting for. Now all we need is thicker passports!” Chelsea Sang, Pacific Rim Shellfish – “The Growing Forward 2 program has proven to be instrumental with our business’ success. Now with the new Export Ready Business Catalogue, we are excited to be able to have yet another resourceful tool for us to build and develop opportunities with buyers from around the world." David Lee Kwen, Misty Mountain Specialties – “Since 2000, Misty Mountain Specialties has been exporting internationally with the help of the federal and provincial governments. Trading has become much simpler and more effective through these partnerships, and the catalogue is another way for B.C. companies to build on that.” Peter Xotta, vice president, planning and operations at Vancouver Fraser Port Authority – “These types of investments to support local businesses and help increase the province’s international exports also reflect the priorities of the Vancouver Fraser Port Authority to grow the port in a sustainable manner to effectively facilitate Canada’s increasing trade. The Port of Vancouver plays a vital economic role by connecting Canadians with the global marketplace and we work closely with government and industry to meet Canada’s trade objectives.”
Quick Facts: Learn More: B.C. Export-Ready Business Catalogue (best viewed in Firefox or Chrome): http://www.britishcolumbia.ca/agrifood-seafood-export-catalogue B.C. Agrifood Sector Snapshot – production and export statistics for 2015: https://www2.gov.bc.ca/assets/gov/farming-natural-resources-and-industry/agriculture-and-seafood/statistics/industry-and-sector-profiles/sector-snapshots/bcsector_snapshot2015_feb_2017_update.pdf
October 2016 - Agrifood October 2016 - CV Farm Cycle Survey - 2 minutes of your time for a CHANCE TO WIN September 2016 - Agrifood Business Planning Program - SSFPA September 2016 - Don't Miss the 6th Annual Comox Valley Farm Cycle Tour! September 2016 - Organic Road Show - Value Added Workshop

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